Pedestrian safety: the role of research

  • H. Taylor

Abstract

In nearly every country people are grappling with the many problems of motorization which increasingly dominate their lives. In some 70 years the transport scene has been revolutionized and the desire for unrestricted personal mobility expressed by the growing ownership of private transport has brought with it many problems not least of which is road safety. Because road accidents have grown up in a transport context they tend to be regarded as inevitable penalty of personal freedom and their dispersal into many incidents each with only a few casualties tends to diminish public appreciation of their overall magnitude. Throughout the world some 1 million people die every 4 years in road accidents and for the young adult road accidents are the major cause of death in many countries; road accidents rank therefore as a public health problem of epidemic proportions. The vast majority of road accidents stem from human failure but the consequences of these failures can be prevented or mitigated by various means; by education and training, by better highway design, by safer operational techniques and by improving vehicle safety.

Keywords

Corn Europe Transportation Turkey Smoke 

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Copyright information

© The Netherlands Institute of Transport 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Taylor
    • 1
  1. 1.Transport and Road Research LaboratoryCrowthornEngland

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