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A Periodic Table of Spatial Hierarchies

  • Michael J. Woldenberg
Part of the Theory and Decision Library book series (TDLU, volume 20)

Abstract

Spatial systems may be organized hierarchically so that large high order areas in a system may collect flows from, or deliver flows to, small low order areas in the system. Examples at a geographical spatial scale are rivers, alpine glaciers and central place systems. Examples in the organic realm are at a much smaller scale, i.e., trees, blood vessels, airways, bile ducts, and even the microscopic branching of the Purkinje cell in the brain.

Keywords

Periodic Table Central Place Random Model Market Area Geometric Progression 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© D. Reidel Publishing Company, Dordrecht, Holland 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael J. Woldenberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of GeographyState University of New York at BuffaloUSA

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