Recent Findings on Cell — Mediated Immune Reactions in Acute Measles and SSPE

  • W. Kreth
  • F. Pabst
Part of the New Perspectives in Clinical Microbiology book series (NPCM, volume 2)

Abstract

It is now more than 10 years that BURNET published his hypothesis on the pathogenesis of SSPE (1). BURNET assumed that the underlying defect was a specific unresponsiveness at the level of T cells. Despite a large body of experimental data (reviewed in (2)) this hypothesis cannot be conclusively answered at present. It is also evident that the mode of action of specific T cells during acute measles itself is incompletely understood. This may be at least partly due to the difficulties in designing appropriate in vitro experiments which explore conclusively specific T cell immunity in man.

Keywords

Toxicity DMSO Influenza Interferon Peri 

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Copyright information

© ECSC, EEC, EAEC, Brussels-Luxembourg 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Kreth
  • F. Pabst

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