Immune Responses in the Cerebrospinal Fluid

  • A. Lowenthal
  • D. Karcher
Part of the New Perspectives in Clinical Microbiology book series (NPCM, volume 2)

Abstract

The immune response may be either referred to cellular or to humoral immunity in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as in all other biological fluids. The study of cellular immunity in CSF has never been thoroughly undertaken, however, recent work has brought important information in this field, and allowed to identify the T lymphocytes (1).

Keywords

Depression Albumin Agar Electrophoresis Fractionation 

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Copyright information

© ECSC, EEC, EAEC, Brussels-Luxembourg 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Lowenthal
  • D. Karcher

There are no affiliations available

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