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Ultrasonic Imaging of Experimental Myocardial Infarcts

  • R. Gramiak
  • R. C. Waag
  • E. A. Schenk
  • P. P. K. Lee
  • K. Thomson
  • P. Macintosh
Part of the Developments in Cardiovascular Medicine book series (DICM, volume 1)

Abstract

The detection of early myocardial infarction by direct inspection of the reflection characteristics of normal and infarcted myocardium represents an important clinical goal in the evaluation of patients with coronary artery disease. Little has been published about this important topic, probably because routine clinical examinations have provided no indication that the muscle change produced by infarction can be detected by reflected ultrasound. The success of computerized axial tomography in demonstrating experimental infarcts (1) prompted us to examine the possibility that ultrasound could be used in a similar manner to detect and image the changes produced by myocardial infarction. To accomplish our goals, we elected to circumvent the signal processing inherent in commercial systems in order to quantitate signal amplitudes directly and to select an image processing mode considered best for differentiating normal from abnormal cardiac muscle by using a computer-based data acquisition and image processing system (2). The purpose of this report is to present our experience from an experimental study dealing with infarcts of various durations.

Keywords

Signal Amplitude Normal Myocardium Ultrasonic Signal Perfusion Deficit Routine Clinical Examination 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishers by, The Hague 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Gramiak
  • R. C. Waag
  • E. A. Schenk
  • P. P. K. Lee
  • K. Thomson
  • P. Macintosh

There are no affiliations available

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