Quantitative Aspects of FT-IR Spectroscopy in Industrial Applications

  • P. H. G. van Kasteren
Part of the NATO Advanced Study Institutes Series book series (ASIC, volume 57)

Abstract

Infrared spectroscopy is an old technique that is widely used for the analysis and identification of materials. It is an optical method based on the absorption of radiation due to vibrations of molecular groups of which the frequencies fall in the infrared region of the spectrum. Up to some ten years ago this kind of spectroscopy was mainly carried out with wavelength or frequency dispersive instruments to record e.g. the energy transmitted through a sample as a function of the wavelength — i.e. the IR spectrum. The limited sensitivity of this technique, however, particularly in comparison with that of fast growing other spectroscopic methods such as mass spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance, caused IR spectroscopy to lose a great deal of its importance.

Keywords

Amide Polyethylene Coherence Alkane Expense 

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References

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    A. SD Zachor and S. M. Aaronson: Delay Compensation; Its Effects in Reducing Sampling Errors in Fourier Spectroscopy. Appl. Optics, 18, 68 (1979).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    J. L. Koenig: Effect on Non-uniform Distribution of Absorbing Material on the Quantitative Measurement of Infrared- band Intensities. Anal. Chemistry, 36, 1045 (1964).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    T. Hirschfield: Diagnosis and Correction of Wedging Errors in Absorbance-subtract Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry. Anal. Chemistry, 51, 495 (1979).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© D. Reidel Publishing Company 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. H. G. van Kasteren
    • 1
  1. 1.Koninklijke/Shell-Laboratorium(Shell Research B.V.)AmsterdamNetherlands

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