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Politics and Organizations

  • Alex C. Michalos
Part of the Crime, Justice, and Politics book series (SSIR, volume 2)

Abstract

Broadly speaking the study of politics is the study of human relations, including natural and manmade lawlike relations. So language and intelligibility are not strained by those who talk about sexual politics, family politics, campaign politics, union politics and so on. Although most of the material introduced in this chapter would fit comfortably within a more restricted view of politics, the last couple sections dealing with labour unions require a broader view.

Keywords

Prime Minister Voter Turnout Annual Percent Change Donor Country Military Expenditure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© D. Reidel Publishing Company, Dordrecht, Holland 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alex C. Michalos
    • 1
  1. 1.University of GuelphOntarioCanada

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