National Versus Sub-National Planning in Israel

  • Raphaella Bilski
  • Itzhak Galnoor
  • Dan Inbar
  • Yohanan Manor
  • Gabriel Sheffer
Part of the The Van Leer Jerusalem Foundation Series book series (JVLF, volume 4)

Abstract

After thirty years of statehood there is still no national planning in Israel, although no significant changes have occurred in variables that could be regarded as conducive to its development. Compared with some Western countries where national planning and state control are viewed with suspicion, in Israel there is no such ideological rejection, but rather a favorable attitude toward determining social goals in some sort of an order or priorities. Furthermore, Israel has maintained a high degree of central government intervention in many aspects of social life, including a firm control over national resources. The state plays an important part both in safeguarding law and order, and in shaping the society and its main patterns of behavior.

Keywords

Migration Manifold Transportation Income Arena 

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Notes

  1. 1.
    See Bertram M. Gross, “The Managers of National Economic Change,” in Roscoe C. Martin, Public Administration and Democracy, Syracuse University Press, Syracuse, 1965, pp. 101–127.Google Scholar
  2. 7.
    Itzhak Galnoor, “Social Indicators for Social Planning: The Case of Israel” Social Indicators Research 1 (1974), 48.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishers bv, The Hague 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Raphaella Bilski
  • Itzhak Galnoor
  • Dan Inbar
  • Yohanan Manor
  • Gabriel Sheffer

There are no affiliations available

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