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Immunological reaction of psychotic patients to fractions of gluten

  • A. Ashkenazi
  • D. Krasilowsky
  • S. Levin
  • D. Idar
  • M. Kalian
  • A. Or
  • Y. Ginat
  • B. Halperin

Abstract

Production of leucocyte migration inhibition factor (LIF) by peripheral blood lymphocytes in response to challenge with gluten fractions was studied in hospitalized schizophrenics and psychotics as compared with normal individuals and children and adolescents with biopsy proven coeliac disease. The schizophrenic and psychotic patients were found to be sub-divided into two groups, one responding in the LIF test like coeliac patients and the other like the normal controls. The psychotic and schizophrenic patients did not show any evidence of malabsorption. It is speculated that in certain psychotic individuals, gluten may be involved in biological processes in the brain.

Keywords

Migration Inhibition Factor Coeliac Disease Wheat Gluten Psychotic Patient Gluten Sensitivity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© MTP Press Limited 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Ashkenazi
  • D. Krasilowsky
  • S. Levin
  • D. Idar
  • M. Kalian
  • A. Or
  • Y. Ginat
  • B. Halperin

There are no affiliations available

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