Advertisement

Biomass Structure and Utilization of the Natural Vegetation in the Winner Rainfall Region of South Africa

  • M. C. Rutherford
Part of the Tasks for Vegetation Science book series (TAVS, volume 4)

Abstract

Several ecological and plant geographical aspects of the vegetation of the winter rainfall part of the Cape Province of South Africa have been recently reviewed by Taylor (1978), Kruger (1979), Day et al. (1979) and Boucher, Moll (in press). This paper does not aim to repeat their broad coverage, but intends to expand on selected aspects of biomass structure and utilization of the vegetation in and adjacent to the winter rainfall area.

Keywords

Flower Head Winter Rainfall Biomass Structure Proteoid Root Succulent Plant 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Acocks JPH (1975) Veld types of South Africa. Memoirs of the Botanical Survey of South Africa No. 40, 2nd edn. Pretoria, Government Printer.Google Scholar
  2. Baard CR (1978) ’n Evaluasie van die veeverminderingskema. Pretoria, Department of Agricultural Technical Services.Google Scholar
  3. Boucher C and Moll EJ (In press) South African mediterranean shrublands.Google Scholar
  4. Brits GJ and von Broembsen S (1978) Protea cultivation: phytophthora root and collar rot. Flowers and ornamental shrubs. No. B6. 1. Pretoria, Government Printer.Google Scholar
  5. Cody ML and Mooney HA (1978) Convergence versus nonconvergence in Mediterranean-climate ecosystems, Ann. Rev. Ecol. Syst. 9, 265–321.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Day J, Siegfried WR, Louw GN and Jarman ML (1979) Fynbos ecology: a preliminary synthesis. South African National Scientific Programmes Report No. 40, Pretoria, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research.Google Scholar
  7. Edwards D (1974) Survey to determine the adequacy of existing conserved areas in relation to vegetation types. A preliminary report, Koedoe 17, 2–38.Google Scholar
  8. Edwards D (1976) Floral resources of Southern Africa. In Baker G, ed. Resources of Southern Africa today and tomorrow, pp. 154 - 160. Johannesburg, Associated Scientific and Technical Societies of South Africa.Google Scholar
  9. Fugler SR (1979) Some aspects of the autecology of three Hakea species in the Cape Province, South Africa. Thesis, Cape Town, University of Cape Town.Google Scholar
  10. Gimingham CH, Chapman SB and Webb NR (1979) European heathlands. In Specht RL, ed. Heathlands and related shrublands of the world, descriptive studies, pp. 365–413. Amsterdam, Elsevier.Google Scholar
  11. Hall AV and Boucher C (1977) The threat posed by alien weeds to the Cape flora. In Proceedings of the second national weeds conference of South Africa, pp. 35–45. Cape Town, Balkema.Google Scholar
  12. Hall H (1974) Miniature “gardens” on our mountain tops, Veld and Flora 4, 54–56.Google Scholar
  13. Hanekom AN (1971) Seisoensopname van fosfor-32, rubidium-86 en tritium-water deur Protea cynaroides (L.) L., Thesis, Stellenbosch, University of Stellenbosch.Google Scholar
  14. Holland PG, Steyn DG and Fuggle RF (1977) Habitat occupation by Aloe ferox Mill. (Liliaceae) in relation to topographic variations in direct beam solar radiation income, J. Biogeogr. 4, 61–72.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Jooste JH, Walters CM and Raitt LM (1980) Aspekte van die minerale voeding van lede van die Proteaceae as verteenwoordigers van die fynbosgemeenskap. In Proceedings of the second annual research meeting of the Fynbos Biome Project, Abstracts, pp. 10. Pretoria, National Programme for Environmental Sciences.Google Scholar
  16. Joubert JGV (1970) Die Robertson-Karoo as weistreek, Proc. Grassld. Soc. Sth. Afr. 5, 62–68.Google Scholar
  17. Joubert JGV (1971) Tn Voorlopige vergelyking tussen twee beweidingstelsels op weskus strandveld, Proc. Grassld. Soc. Sth. Afr. 6, 78–81.Google Scholar
  18. Joubert JGV and Stindt HW (1979) The nutritive value and general evaluation of natural pastures in the districts of Montagu, Robertson and Worcester in the winter rainfall area of the Republic of South Africa. Department of Agricultural Technical Services, Technical Communication No. 155. Pretoria, Government Printer.Google Scholar
  19. Joubert JGV, Stindt HW and Perold IS (1969) The nutritive value of natural pastures in the districts of Calitzdorp, George, Knysna, Mossel Bay, Oudtshoorn and Uniondale in the winter rainfall area of the Republic of South Africa. Department of Agricultural Technical Services, Technical Communication No. 82. Pretoria, Government Printer.Google Scholar
  20. Joubert JGV and van Breda PAB (1976) Vestingsmetodes vir Osteospermum sinuatum in die veld van die Klein Karoo, Proc. Grassld. Soc. Sth. Afr. 11, 123–124.Google Scholar
  21. Kruger FJ (1977) A preliminary account of aerial plant biomass in fynbos communities of the Mediterranean-type climate zone of the Cape Province, Bothalia 23, 301–307.Google Scholar
  22. Kruger FJ (1979) South African heathlands. In Specht RL, ed. Heathlands and related shrublands of the world, descriptive studies, pp. 19–80. Amsterdam, Elsevier.Google Scholar
  23. Kruger FJ (In press) Seasonal growth and flowering rhythms: South African heathlands. In Specht RL, ed. Heathlands and related shrub- lands, process studies. Amsterdam, Elsevier.Google Scholar
  24. Kruger FJ and Bigalke RC (In press) Fire in fynbos.Google Scholar
  25. Kruger FJ and Taylor HC (1979) Plant species diversity in Cape fynbos: gamma and delta diversity, Vegetatio 41, 85–93.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Laidler D, Moll EJ, Campbell BM and Glyphis J (1978) Phytosociological studies on Table Mountain, South Africa: 2. the front table, J. S. Afr. Bot. 44, 291–295.Google Scholar
  27. Lamont B (1980) The biology of proteoid roots and extrafloral nectaries in the Proteaceae. In Proceedings of the second annual research meeting of the Fynbos Biome Project, Abstracts, pp. 11. Pretoria, National Programme for Environmental Sciences.Google Scholar
  28. Le Roux HH (1966) Veldbestuur in die water-opvanggebiede van die winterreenstreek van Suidwes-Kaapland, Forestry in South Africa 6, 1–32.Google Scholar
  29. Levyns MR (1956) Notes on the biology and distribution of the renoster bush, S. Afr. J. Sci. 52, 141–143.Google Scholar
  30. Meynhardt JT (1976) Proteas: vestiging en versorging. Flowers, ornamental shrubs and trees. No. B4. Pretoria, Department of Agricultural Technical Services.Google Scholar
  31. Moll EJ, McKenzie B and McLachlan D (1980) A possible explanation for the lack of trees in the fynbos, Cape Province, South Africa, Biol. Conserv. 17, 221–228.Google Scholar
  32. Mooney HA, Troughton JH and Berry JA (1977) Carbon isotope ratio measurements of succulent plants in southern Africa, Oecologia (Berl.) 30, 295–305.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Nagel JF (1962) Fog precipitation measurements on Africa’s southwest coast, Notos 11, 51–60.Google Scholar
  34. Olivier MC (1966) Die plantegroei en flora van die Worcester Veldreservaat. Thesis, Stellenbosch, University of Stellenbosch.Google Scholar
  35. Rourke J (1974) On restios and roofs, Veld and Flora 4, 57–59.Google Scholar
  36. Roux CJO (1979) An analysis of the western Cape Proteaceae exporter. Technical Report, Graduate School of Business. Stellenbosch, University of Stellenbosch.Google Scholar
  37. Rust DJ and Myburgh AC (1975) Pests as a factor limiting the development of the Protea industry, Veld and Flora 61, 16–19.Google Scholar
  38. Rutherford MC (1978a) Karoo-fynbos biomass along an elevational gradient in the western Cape, Bothalia 12, 555–560.Google Scholar
  39. Rutherford MC (1978b) Primary production ecology in Southern Africa. In Werger MJA, ed. Biogeography and ecology of southern Africa, pp. 621–659. The Hague, Junk.Google Scholar
  40. Specht RL (1979) The sclerophyllous (heath) vegetation of Australia: the eastern and central states. In Specht RL, ed. Heathlands and related shrublands, descriptive studies, pp. 125–210. Amsterdam, Elsevier.Google Scholar
  41. Stindt HW, Cilliers PG, Joubert JGV and Perold IS (1965) The nutritive value of natural pastures in the Humansdorp area in the South east Cape Province of the Republic of South Africa. Department of Agricultural Technical Services, Techni¬cal Communication No. 45. Pretoria, Government Printer.Google Scholar
  42. Stindt HW and Joubert JGV (1979) The nutritive value of natural pastures in the districts of Ladismith, Riversdale and Heidelberg in the winter rainfall area of the Republic of South Africa. Department of Agricultural Technical Services, Technical Communication No. 154. Pretoria, Government Printer.Google Scholar
  43. Taylor HC (1972) Fynbos, Veld and Flora 2, 68–75.Google Scholar
  44. Taylor HC (1977) The Cape floral kingdom an ecological view. In Proceedings of the second national weeds conference of South Africa, pp. 19–33. Cape Town, Balkema.Google Scholar
  45. Taylor HC (1978) Capensis. In Werger MJA, ed. Biogeography and ecology of southern Africa, pp. 171–229. The Hague, Junk.Google Scholar
  46. Taylor HC (1979) Observations on the flora and phytogeography of Rooiberg, a dry fynbos mountain in the southern Cape Province, South Africa, Phytocoenologia 6, 524–531.Google Scholar
  47. Van der Merwe P (1966) Die flora van Swartboskloof, Stellenbosch en die herstel van die soorte na fn brand. Annals of the University of Stellenbosch Volume 41 Series A No. 14. Stellenbosch, University of Stellenbosch.Google Scholar
  48. Van Rensburg WLJ (1962) Die aandeel van grasse in veldtipes rondom Stellenbosch. Thesis, Stellenbosch, University of Stellenbosch.Google Scholar
  49. Van Wilgen BW (In press) Aerial plant biomass of fynbos communities at Jonkershoek, Stellenbosch.Google Scholar
  50. Vogts MM (1971) Die geografie en die geografiese variasie van Protea cynaroides. Thesis, Stellenbosch, University of Stellenbosch.Google Scholar
  51. Vogts MM (1977a) The bearded proteas. Flowers, decorative shrubs and trees. No. B8. Pretoria, Government Printer.Google Scholar
  52. Vogts MM (1977b) Protea cynaroides (L.) L. intensive cut-flower cultivation: Part I. Flowers, ornamental shrubs and trees. No. B9. Pretoria, Department of Agricultural Technical Services.Google Scholar
  53. Vogts MM (1977c) Protea cynaroides (L.) L. intensive cut-flower cultivation: Part I I. Flowers, ornamental shrubs and trees. No. BIO. Pretoria, Government Printer.Google Scholar
  54. Vogts MM (1979) Proteas: intensive cut- flower cultivation Leucospermum species. Flowers and ornamental shrubs. No. B12, Pretoria, Government Printer.Google Scholar
  55. Werger MJA (In press) The Karoo and southern Kalahari. In Evenari M and Noy-Meir I, eds. Hot desert and arid shrubland. Amsterdam, Elsevier.Google Scholar
  56. Werger MJA and Ellis RP (In press) Distribution of photosynthetic pathways in the arid parts of South Africa.Google Scholar
  57. Werger MJA, Kruger FJ and Taylor HC (1972) A phytosociological study of the Cape fynbos and other vegetation at Jonkershoek, Stellenbosch, Bothalia 10, 599–614.Google Scholar
  58. Wicht CL (1971) The task of forestry in the Mountains of the western and southern Cape Province, Proc. Grassld. Soc. Sth. Afr. 6, 20–27.Google Scholar
  59. Wiens D and Rourke JP (1978) Rodent pollination in southern African Protea spp., Nature 276, 71–73.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Dr W. Junk Publishers, The Hague/Boston/London 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. C. Rutherford
    • 1
  1. 1.Botanical Research InstituteSouth Africa

Personalised recommendations