Advertisement

Occlusion in Dynamic Scene Analysis

  • W. N. Martin
  • J. K. Aggarwal
Part of the NATO Advanced Study Institutes Series book series (ASIC, volume 77)

Abstract

This paper presents several fundamental concepts necessary for the successful analysis of dynamic scenes containing occluding objects by discussing various systems which have been developed to perform this analysis. The dynamic scenes are represented by time ordered sequences of images. Data must be extracted from each of these images and then integrated into coherent information about the sequence as a whole.

Keywords

Object Model Object Boundary Angular Measure Dynamic Scene Occlude Object 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    W.N. Martin and J.K. Aggarwal, “Dynamic scene analysis: A survey,” Computer Graphics and Image Processing, vol. 7, no. 3, June 1978, pp. 356–374.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    J.K. Aggarwal and R.O. Duda, “Computer analysis of moving polygonal images,” IEEE Trans. on Comp., vol. C-24, no. 10, October 1975, pp. 966–976.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    W.N. Martin and J.K. Aggarwal, “Computer analysis of dynamic scenes containing curvilinear figures,” Pattern Recognition, vol. 11, 1979, pp. 169–178.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    R. Jain, W.N. Martin, and J.K. Aggarwal, “Segmentation through the detection of changes due to motion,” Computer Graphics and Image Processing, vol. 11, no. 3, 1979, pp. 13–34.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    J.W. Roach and J.K. Aggarwal, “Computer tracking of objects moving in space,” IEEE Trans. on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, vol. PAMI-1, no. 2, April 1979, pp. 127–135.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    J.W. Roach and J.K. Aggarwal, “On the ambiguity of three-dimensional analysis of a moving object from its images,” WCATVI, 1979, pp. 46–47.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    J. Webb, “Static analysis of moving jointed objects,” to appear in the First National Artificial Intelligence Conference, Stanford, California, 1980.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    S. Yalamanchili, W.N. Martin, and J.K. Aggarwal, “Differencing operations for the segmentation of moving objects in dynamic scenes,” to appear in the Fifth International Conference on Pattern Recognition, Miami, Florida, 1980.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    H.-H. Nagel, “Analysis techniques for image sequences,” International Joint Conference on Pattern Recognition, 1978, pp. 186–211.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Abstracts of the Workshop on Computer Analysis of Time-Varing Imagery (WCATVI), J.K. Aggarwal and N.I. Badler, eds., 1979.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    R. Petermann, “Computer analysis of planar motion of polygons,” Master’s Thesis, University of Texas at Austin, Jan. 1975.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    W.K. Qiow and J.K. Aggarwal, “Computer analysis of planar curvilinear moving images,” IEEE Trans. on Comp., vol. C-26, no. 2, Feb. 1977, pp. 179–185.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    J.W. McKee and J.K. Aggarwal, “Finding the edges of surfaces of three-dimensional curved objects by computer,” Pattern Recognition, vol. 7, 1975, pp. 25–52.MATHCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© D. Reidel Publishing Company 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. N. Martin
    • 1
  • J. K. Aggarwal
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Electrical Engineering and Computer SciencesThe University of Texas at AustinAustinUSA

Personalised recommendations