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Origin of Life pp 559-566 | Cite as

Evolution of the Rhodospirillaceae and Mitochondria: A View Based on Sequence Data

  • M. O. Dayhoff
  • R. M. Schwartz
Conference paper

Abstract

New sequence data from several protein families and from 5S ribosomal RNA confirm and elaborate our description of the phylogenetic connections between a variety of bacteria and the eukaryotes (1,2). Probably the first organisms were nonphotosynthetic anaerobic prokaryotes, which were followed soon by photosynthetic anaerobes. From this photosynthetic stock the aerobic line to Pseudomonadacae, Rhodospirillaceae, and blue-greens arose. The eukaryotes derived genetic material from the symbioses of at least three separate bacterial lines. Ancestors of Rhodopseudomonas globiformis gave rise to the eukaryote mitochondria, probably through at least three separate symbioses, one early on the flagellate line, one on the ciliate line, and one on the stem to the multicellular forms.

Keywords

Paracoccus Denitrificans Composite Tree Multicellular Form National Biomedical Research Foundation Proteolipid Subunit 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© D. Reidel Publishing Company 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. O. Dayhoff
    • 1
  • R. M. Schwartz
    • 1
  1. 1.Georgetown University and National Biomedical Research FoundationUSA

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