An Overview of the U.S.A. Program for the Development of Thermal Energy Storage for Solar Energy Applications

  • Allan I. Michaels
Conference paper

Abstract

The administrative responsibility for thermal energy storage (TES) technology in the U.S.A. resides chiefly in the DOE Office of Solar Applications for Buildings (OSAB), and the Office of Advanced Conservation Technology (OACT). Management support and technical direction of DOE projects are provided by several U.S.A. National Laboratories. The organizational structure related to TES programs is given in Figure 1.

Keywords

Convection Foam Hull Hydride Polyurethane 

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Copyright information

© TNO and Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, The Hague 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Allan I. Michaels
    • 1
  1. 1.Argonne National LaboratoryArgonneUSA

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