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Photosynthate Limitation of Symbiotic N2 Fixation

  • K. Andersen
  • S. T. Lim
  • H. Spiller
  • K. T. Shanmugam
  • R. C. Valentine
Chapter
Part of the Developments in Plant and Soil Sciences book series (DPSS, volume 3)

Abstract

For the past several years our laboratory has studied various aspects of the energetics of nitrogen fixation, experiments leading to the conclusion that there is a high metabolic energy cost for this process (1). Several of these experiments will be discussed below (see Figs. 1 and 4 for integration of this work). Subsequently, research focused on enhancing the energy efficiency of symbiotic N2 fixation has been emphasized. Important questions are:
  1. 1.

    How significant is the oxygenase function of the host plant ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase in terms of efficiency of photosynthate production supporting symbiotic N2 fixation? Can the oxygenase function be altered by mutations?

     
  2. 2.

    What parameters control the efficiency of photosynthate conversion linked to symbiotic nitrogen fixation? Is the nitrogenase-mediated H2 evolution of rhizobial bacteroids a constant or a variable function?

     
  3. 3.

    Do cyclic mononucleotides (cAMP/cGMP) function as chemical messengers integrating availability and efficiency of utilization of photosynthate in nodules?

     
  4. 4.

    Is photosynthate a limiting factor for nitrogen fixation in heterocystous blue-green algae and their symbiotic associations (e.g., Azolla)?

     

Keywords

Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation Anabaena Variabilis MoFe Protein RuBP Carboxylase Rhizobium Japonicum 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff / Dr W. Junk Publishers, The Hague - Boston - London 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Andersen
  • S. T. Lim
  • H. Spiller
  • K. T. Shanmugam
  • R. C. Valentine
    • 1
  1. 1.Plant Growth Laboratory, Agronomy and Range Science Dept.University of California at DavisUSA

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