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Direct Gradient Analysis

  • Robert H. Whittaker
Part of the Handbook of Vegetation Science book series (HAVS, volume 5-2)

Abstract

Community samples (‘Aufnahmen,’ relevés) are the essential working material for gradient analysis. The procedures to be described below can (with some limitations) be applied to any kind of community sample. Thus one can, in principle, use for gradient analysis samples of the vascular plants of forests, lichens on the barks of trees, singing bird pairs of grasslands, marine Zooplankton, or soil microarthropods. We shall concern ourselves primarily, however, with samples that include the vascular plants (with or without accompanying data on thallophytes) from land communities. A sample will normally include (i) a list of plant species present in a given study area, the plot or quadrat, (ii) some indications of relative importance of these species (and usually of their growth-forms, heights, and stratal relationships), and (iii) supporting information on environment, soil, community structure, and evidences of disturbance and community change.

Keywords

Environmental Gradient Beta Diversity Elevation Gradient Ecological Group Gradient Analysis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Dr W. Junk b.v. — Publishers — The Hague 1978

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  • Robert H. Whittaker

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