Advertisement

The Internal Structure of the Sun, its Pulsations and the Neutrino Problem

Conference paper
  • 76 Downloads
Part of the NATO Advanced Study Institutes Series book series (ASIC, volume 85)

Abstract

The theory of the internal structure of the Sun is described. The standard models of the Sun predict a neutrino flux which is three time larger than that measured by Davis experiment. It is not clear whether this dramatic discrepancy depends on the ideas of stellar structure and evolution theory or on neutrino physics. A convincing attempt to reconcile theory and observations has been done constructing a solar model with a very low primordial abundance of heavy elements. This model predicts the correct neutrino flux, but has a convective zone much thinner than that of the standard model. The observed spectrum of 5 minute oscillations, which is extremely sensitive to the depth of the convection zone, can only be reproduced by the standard model indicating that neutrino flux is high. In recent times, a series of independent experiments have not excluded the possibility that neutrino is massive and oscillates in three different types. Should this be the case, assuming and equally probable mixure of the three neutrinos, the experiment of Davis should actually detect one third of the neutrino flux produced by the Sun at the Earth’s surface.

Keywords

Convective Zone Solar Neutrino Stellar Evolution Neutrino Flux Stellar Structure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Bahcall, J.N.: 1979, Space Science Reviews 24, pp. 227–251.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Belvedere, G., Gough, D.O., and Paternò, L.: 1981, preprint.Google Scholar
  3. Berthomieu, G., Cooper, A.J., Gough, D.O., Osaki, Y., Provost, J., and Rocca, A.: 1980, Nonradial and Nonlinear Stellar Pulsation, H.A. Hill and W. Dziembowski (eds.), Springer-Verlag, New York, pp. 307–312.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Christensen-Dalsgaard, J., Gough, D.O., and Morgan, J.G.: 1979, Astron. Astrophys. 73, pp. 121–128.ADSGoogle Scholar
  5. Cox, J.P.: 1980, Theory of Stellar Pulsation, Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.Google Scholar
  6. Cox, J.P., and Giuli, R.T.: 1968, Principles of Stellar Structure, Vol. 1, Gordon and Breach, New York.Google Scholar
  7. Cox, A.N., and Steward, J.N.: 1970, Astrophys.J. Suppl. 19, pp. 243–259.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Davis, R., and Evans, J.C.: 1978, The New Solar Physics, J.A. Eddy (ed.), Westview Press, Boulder, Colorado, pp. 35–57.Google Scholar
  9. Deubner, F.L., Ulrich, R.K., and Rhodes, E.J.: 1979, Astron. Astrophys. 72, pp. 177–185.ADSGoogle Scholar
  10. Fowler, W.A., Caughlam, G.R., and Zimmerman, B.A.: 1967, Annual Rev. Astron. Astrophys. 5, pp. 525–570.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Fowler, W.A., Caughlam, G.R., and Zimmerman, B.A.: 1975, Annual Rev. Astron. Astrophys. 13, pp. 69–112.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Hill, H.A.: 1978, The New Solar Physics, J.A. Eddy (ed.), Westview Press, Boulder, Colorado, pp. 135–214.Google Scholar
  13. Lubkin, G.B.: 1980, Physics Today, 33, 7, pp. 17–19.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Reeves, H.: 1966, Stellar Evolution, R.F. Stein and A.G. Cameron (eds.), Plenum Press, New York, pp. 83–122.Google Scholar
  15. Rosenwald, R.D., and Hill, H.A.: 1980, Nonradial and Nonlinear Stellar Pulsation, H.A. Hill and W. Dziembowski (eds.), Springer-Verlag, New York, pp. 404–412.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Stein, R.F.: 1966, Stellar Evolution, R.F. Stein and A.G. Cameron (eds.), Plenum Press, New York, pp. 3–79.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© D. Reidel Publishing Company 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania, Istituto di Fisica della Facoltà di Ingegneriadell ’Università di CataniaItaly

Personalised recommendations