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Dynamics of the Asteroids

Conference paper
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Part of the NATO Advanced Study Institutes Series book series (ASIC, volume 85)

Abstract

The main features of asteroidal dynamics are demonstrated in Figures 1–4 which show the frequency distributions for perihelion distances, aphelion distances, simimajor axes and inclinations of the numbered asteroids. The large majority of the known asteroids is situated in a belt between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. Obviously, the boundaries of the belt are due to these two planets. The dynamics of the belt asteroids is at present mainly determined by Jupiter. In the past, also collisions among asteroids played an important role which is indicated by the Hirayama families. Those asteroids which cross the orbits of a planet might have suffered or will suffer drastic changes in their orbits or will even collide with that planet unless particular protection mechanisms prevent such close approaches.

Keywords

Secular Term Close Encounter Belt Asteroid Main Belt Resonant Orbit 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© D. Reidel Publishing Company 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Astronomisches Rechen-InstitutHeidelbergGermany

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