In Vivo Intracortical Loading Histories Calculated from Bone Strain Telemetry

  • W. E. Caler
  • D. R. Carter
  • R. Vasu
  • J. C. McCarthy
  • W. H. Harris
Part of the Developments in Biomechanics book series (DEBI, volume 1)

Abstract

Strain gages have been used by many researchers to measure bone strain in animals during gait (Evans, 1953; Lanyon and Smith, 1969, 1970; Lanyon 1973; Barnes and Pinder, 1974; Cochran, 1974; Turner et al. 1975; Rybicki et al. 1977; Carter et al. 1980). Sumner-Smith et al. (1977) reported the use of a telemetry system to record information from a strain gage rosette attached to the horse metacarpal. The telemetry system allows strain measurements to be taken at various levels of exercise without introducing gait constraints. In this paper, intracortical strain distributions have been calculated for the midshaft canine radius from telemetered and hard-wired in vivo strain gage information.

Keywords

Harness 

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, The Hague, Boston, London 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. E. Caler
    • 1
  • D. R. Carter
    • 1
  • R. Vasu
    • 1
  • J. C. McCarthy
    • 1
  • W. H. Harris
    • 1
  1. 1.Orthopaedic Research LaboratoriesMassachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA

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