Preliminary Experience with Marcellomycin: Preclinical and Clinical Aspects

  • M. Rozencweig
  • C. Nicaise
  • P. Dodion
  • M. Piccart
  • D. Bron
  • M. Mattelaer
  • P. Dumont
  • G. Atassi
  • P. Strijkmans
  • Y. Kenis
Part of the Developments in Oncology book series (DION, volume 10)

Abstract

Marcellomycin is a pyrromycinone glycoside isolated by fractionation of the bohemic acid complex, an anthracycline mixture obtained from fermentations of Actinospohangium sp. (1). Its chemical structure is closely related to that of aclacinomycin A (Fig. 1). The antitumor effect of the drug has been ascribed, at least in part, to its ability to inhibit nucleolar RNA synthesis (2). In Novikoff hepatoma ascites cells, this inhibition requires concentrations more than 1000-fold lower than those necessary to inhibit DNA synthesis whereas doxorubicin as well as pyrromycin inhibit DNA and nucleolar RNA synthesis at similar concentrations (3).

Keywords

Fatigue Toxicity Fermentation Leukemia Fractionation 

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, The Hague 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Rozencweig
  • C. Nicaise
  • P. Dodion
  • M. Piccart
  • D. Bron
  • M. Mattelaer
  • P. Dumont
  • G. Atassi
  • P. Strijkmans
  • Y. Kenis

There are no affiliations available

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