Continuous Blood Pressure Measurement

  • Peter Sleight
Part of the Developments in Cardiovascular Medicine book series (DICM, volume 20)

Abstract

Cuff blood pressure measurement has changed very little since the beginning of this century and has provided an immense amount of valuable data on outcome and risk. Restrictions of the technique make it of limited value in sleep, exercise or at work, although there are now devices which inflate and deflate automatically. Perhaps the biggest problem is the alerting or defence reaction which is engendered by the observer or even by the cuff inflation with automatic devices. For this reason there have been many attempts to develop systems which track blood pressure non invasively. We have used the measurement of pulse wave velocity to follow beat to beat changes in pressure (1). This and similar systems have not so far proved adequate for ambulatory use, and all indirect systems have severe problems with calibration and validation.

Keywords

Placebo Catheter Polythene Rubber Heparin 

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, The Hague 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Sleight

There are no affiliations available

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