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Ectomycorrhizae in the tropics

  • J. F. Redhead
Part of the Developments in Plant and Soil Sciences book series (DPSS, volume 5)

Abstract

Ectomycorrhizae are symbiotic associations between fungi and plant roots in which the fungus forms a sheath around all or some of the fine absorbing rootlets. Hyphae penetrate between the root cells and occasionally enter the cells but they never penetrate beyond the cortex and any intracellular hyphae do not cause destruction of the host cell.

Keywords

Mycorrhizal Fungus Ectomycorrhizal Fungus Mycorrhizal Root Mycorrhizal Association Pinus Radiata 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Martinus Nijhoff/Dr W. Junk Publishers, The Hague/Boston/London 1982

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  • J. F. Redhead

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