Introductory

  • Herbert Spiegelberg
Part of the Phaenomenologica book series (PHAE, volume 5/6)

Abstract

There can be little question that after the early thirties the center of gravity of the Phenomenological Movement has moved to the French philosophical world; Belgium and the Netherlands may be considered as subsidiary strongholds. But how far is it justified to speak of phenomenology as a philosophical movement in France? Thus far the French-speaking world has had no such central figure as Husserl or any phenomenological circle comparable to those that sprang up under his influence, nor is there any such center of phenomenological publications as Husserl’s yearbook had been. It is true that the magazine Recherches philosophiques in the years between 1931 and 1937 gave phenomenology preferential treatment. Also since 1947 the Études philosophiques under the direction of Gaston Berger devoted special attention to phenomenology. And even the old Revue de métaphysique et de morale has shown a strong phenomenological tinge of late. Even more important as a focus of phenomenological developments were the Husserl Archives at the University of Louvain under the directorship of Father H. L. Van Breda. For here is not only a center of historical research in phenomenology.

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Selective Bibliography

  1. Hering, Jean, “Phenomenology in France” in Farber, M., ed., Philosophic Thought in France and the United States. University of Buffalo, 1950, pp. 67–86.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Herbert Spiegelberg

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