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The AFDC-Unemployed Fathers Program

Determinants of Participation and Implications for Welfare Reform
  • James R. Hosek
Chapter
Part of the Middlebury Conference Series on Economic Issues book series (MCSEI)

Abstract

The U.S. income transfer system provides less coverage for married, spouse-present families than for single-parent families. One reason for this is the limited scope of coverage for such families within the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) program. The AFDC program has two components, Family Group (FG) and Unemployed Father (UF). The UF component, created in 1961, serves husband-and-wife families in adverse economic circumstances. In contrast, the FG component, dating from the beginning of AFDC in 1936, primarily aids single- parent families. UF tends to furnish less coverage than does FG because UF families must satisfy certain eligibility requirements (discussed below) beyond those of FG.

Keywords

Food Stamp Family Participation Food Stamp Program Unearned Income Asset Test 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Nijhoff Publishing 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • James R. Hosek

There are no affiliations available

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