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Behavior and ultrastructure of sensory organs in rotifers

  • Pierre Clément
  • Elizabeth Wurdak
  • Jacqueline Amsellem
Conference paper
Part of the Developments in Hydrobiology book series (DIHY, volume 14)

Abstract

For the most part, rotifer behavior consists of simple, coded responses to external stimulation. Though these responses are readily observable, they have rarely been studied in detail. We are referring to responses such as the retraction of the head of the animal into the trunk following mechanical or chemical contact or the jumps of Polyarthra elicited by the same stimuli. Certain movements such as the typical cases of positive photo-taxis also belong to this category.

Keywords

rotifers mechanoreceptors chemoreceptors photoreceptors feeding behavior mating behavior analysis of trajects 

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Copyright information

© Dr W. Junk Publishers, The Hague 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pierre Clément
    • 1
  • Elizabeth Wurdak
    • 1
  • Jacqueline Amsellem
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratoire Histologie, L. A. CNRS 244, GIS Physiologie, Sensorielle, CMEABG and RCP CNRS 657Université Lyon IVilleurbanneFrance

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