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Continuous culture of the rotifer Brachionus plicatilis fed recycled algal diets

  • H. Hirata
  • S. Yamasaki
  • T. Kawaguchi
  • M. Ogawa
Conference paper
Part of the Developments in Hydrobiology book series (DIHY, volume 14)

Abstract

A culture system for the rotifer Brachionus plicatilis was designed to maintain higher food conversion rates and stable population densities. Two 2001 plastic tanks were employed in the culture experiments, tank A for ‘feedback’ culture and tank B for a control culture. The experiments were carried out for 70 days at 24°C, light intensity, 1500 lux, and a photoperiod of L:D 15:9. B. plicatilis were fed once a day on baker’s yeast and Chlorella.

Food conversion rates in tanks A and B were 24.7% and 10.1%, respectively. Population density of B. plicatilis in tank A was consistently stable at 100–150 ind. Ml−1 throughout the culture period. Density in tank B, however, showed large fluctuations after 40 or 50 days and by the end of the experiment, declined to zero.

Keywords

rotifers recycle culture-ecosystem Brachionus 

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References

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Copyright information

© Dr W. Junk Publishers, The Hague 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Hirata
    • 1
  • S. Yamasaki
    • 1
  • T. Kawaguchi
    • 1
  • M. Ogawa
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of FisheriesKagoshima UniversityKagoshimaJapan

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