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Images of the Future

  • Henry N. WagnerJr.
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSE, volume 61)

Abstract

More than any other branch of medicine, nuclear medicine teaches us that structure and function are but two aspects of the same thing. In biological systems what we call structures are slow processes of long duration. What we call functions are fast processes of short duration. Nuclear images are symbolic representations of the patterns and changes in the spatial and temporal distribution of the chemical substances that make up our bodies. Until now, our major concepts of disease have been based on the discipline of gross pathology, which provides a limited sort of information analogous to that obtained from an archeological excavation.

Keywords

Dopamine Receptor Radioactive Tracer Opiate Receptor Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging Cerebral Glucose Metabolism 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, The Hague 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Henry N. WagnerJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.The Johns Hopkins Medical InstitutionsBaltimoreUSA

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