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Introduction

  • Knud Kristensen
  • Elisabeth Nørbygaard
Part of the Developments in Nuclear Medicine book series (DNUM, volume 4)

Abstract

A very large part of nuclear medicine procedures to-day is based on radiopharmaceuticals prepared from Tc-99m generators and preparation kits. Modern generators and kits are in general considered to be effective and simple to operate. They are supposed to give products of adequate quality. Generators and kits may come from different origins and thereby we are faced with the problem of compatibility. The final radiopharmaceutical may involve two different manufacturers and further the radiopharmacist or technician at the hospital doing the necessary steps of preparation. From this follows the problem of divided responsibility and the question: to what extent must quality control programmes be part of good r ad ioph arm ac y practice at the hospital. In view of the increasing awareness of quality requirements and of responsibilities for quality assurance it is certain that more resources will be used both by manufacturers and by hospitals in the future. It is therefore relevant to discuss where in the system this will be most cost-effective. These questions are reviewed in the following 5 chapters (23–27) by experts from manufacturers, hospitals and regulatory authorities.

Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, Boston 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Knud Kristensen
    • 1
  • Elisabeth Nørbygaard
    • 1
  1. 1.The Isotope-PharmacyThe National Board of HealthCopenhagenDenmark

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