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Flexner, Accreditation, and Evaluation

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Part of the Evaluation in Education and Human Services book series (EEHS, volume 6)

Abstract

Accreditation, the process by which an organization grants approval to an educational institution, is the central issue in several current debates among educators. The major parties in these debates are the various representatives of elementary and secondary school teachers, on the one hand, and the faculty members of schools of education, on the other. State education agencies also play an important part in these debates, but they have not been as much in the forefront as have the other two parties.

Keywords

Teacher Education Common Sense Secondary School Teacher Accreditation Process Document Reproduction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Kluwer-Nijhoff Publishing 1983

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