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Selection of sites for egg deposition and spawning dynamics in the waccamaw darter

  • David G. Lindquist
  • John R. Shute
  • Peggy W. Shute
  • L. Michael Jones
Chapter
  • 51 Downloads
Part of the Developments in environmental biology of fishes book series (DEBF, volume 4)

Synopsis

We provided 93 experimental spawning covers for the waccamaw darter. We grouped the covers (3 sizes of slate and one of concave tile) in three arrangements at six Lake Waccamaw locations to separate the variables of water depth, distance from shore, cover density and cover type. Tag returns of marked males suggest low fidelity for nest sites. Egg production under the 3 different sizes of slate was not significantly different. Egg production under the tile was significantly less than that under the slates. Egg production was significantly higher off the undeveloped southeastern shore in 2 m of water and lowest at the shallowest location with the highest experimental cover density. The number of eggs in nest is positively correlated with male size. We conclude that medium size slate covers placed in a linear arrangement in 2 m of water on a mixed sand bottom result in the highest egg production for the waccamaw darter.

Keywords

Experimental spawning cover Breeding season Nest choice Nest fidelity Nest egg number Nest quality Male and female size Fish Percids 

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Copyright information

© Dr W. Junk Publishers, The Hague 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • David G. Lindquist
    • 1
  • John R. Shute
    • 1
  • Peggy W. Shute
    • 1
  • L. Michael Jones
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biological SciencesUniversity of North Carolina-WilmingtonUSA

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