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Some Epistemologically Misleading Expressions: “Inference” and “Anumāna”, “Perception” and “Pratyakṣa”

  • Douglas D. Daye
Part of the Synthese Library book series (SYLI, volume 178)

Abstract

In this article, I shall focus on the four terms of the title. The implications of the present remarks will be argued elsewhere.

Keywords

Valid Inference Formal Validity Perceptual Cognition Deductive Inference Indian Logic 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© D. Reidel Publishing Company 1985

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  • Douglas D. Daye

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