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A Speech-Act Model for Understanding Nayva-Nyāya Epistemology

  • Karl H. Potter
Chapter
Part of the Synthese Library book series (SYLI, volume 178)

Abstract

Is there philosophical analysis in Indian thought? The question is interpretable in numerous ways, among which are these: (1) do Indian philosophers attempt to clarify concepts by analyzing them into their components? and (2) does one find in Indian philosophy concepts of the sort used by analytic philosophers in the West? I’m quite sure of the answer to (l); it is in the affirmative. One can easily locate attempts to clarify through analysis in Indian thought. Unless one places further restrictions on what is going to count as “analysis”, one can find such attempts in just about anybody’s thought: it would be surprising if any sophisticated culture was so uninquisitive that its members didn’t regularly ask each other what they were talking about.

Keywords

Classical Analysis Philosophical Analysis True Proposition Epistemic Attitude Indian Philosophy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© D. Reidel Publishing Company 1985

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  • Karl H. Potter

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