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Air-Chamber Sensing for Blood Pressure Monitoring

  • P. Petrou
  • N. Yannopoulos
  • S. Stamatelopoulos
  • S. Moulopoulos
Chapter
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Part of the Developments in Cardiovascular Medicine book series (DICM, volume 37)

Abstract

A non-invasive method for blood pressure (BP) monitoring, by using a continuously inflated air-chamber, positioned against the area of either brachial or radial artery pulsation is tested. Tracings obtained via conventional pressure transducers or a catheter-tip-manometer through 5 types of air-chambers are compared to simultaneously obtained tracings, via an intraarterial catheter. The pulse tracings obtained via an air-chamber of 2.0×2.5×4.0 cm, positioned into the empty case of a wrist watch and placed against the area of the radial artery pulsations showed a highly significant correlation (p varying from p<0.01 to p<0.001, in 20 patients, 10 hypertensives and 10 normotensives) to the simultaneously recorded intraarterial BP tracings for a time period of 2 hours.

Keywords

Blood Pressure Monitoring Blood Pressure Reading Hypertension Detection Wrist Watch Pulse Tracing 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© ECSC, EEC, EAEC, Brussels-Luxembourg 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Petrou
    • 1
  • N. Yannopoulos
    • 1
  • S. Stamatelopoulos
    • 1
  • S. Moulopoulos
    • 1
  1. 1.Medical Department Clinical TherapeuticsAthens University, Alexandra HospitalAthensGreece

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