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Hazards to the paint user

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Abstract

This chapter deals exclusively with those hazards which may confront anyone having to handle paint, particularly when applying it, and also those hazards associated with its storage. Any reference to the hazards centred on the actual manufacture of paint, has been deliberately omitted as outside the scope of this book. It aims to provide health and safety information relating to paint whether the user be a do-it-yourself enthusiast, a professional house decorator or maintenance man, or the employer or employee of a works manufacturing products such as cars and engineering components where paint is utilized not only for decorative but for protective purposes.

Keywords

Lead Poisoning Skin Absorption Cashew Nutshell Liquid Dust Explosion Toxic Hazard 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© M. Hess, H.R. Hamburg and W.M. Morgans 1979

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