Advertisement

Social Networks and the Ecology of Human Development: Theory, Research and Application

  • Barton J. Hirsch
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (ASID, volume 24)

Abstract

Despite the upsurge of research on social support, we are only beginning to analyze the processes by which social support may affect mental health and well-being. Numerous studies do point to a positive association between support and mental health, sometimes as a “main effect,” while at other tines as a buffer against the effect of ongoing strain or discrete life events. These studies indicate that social support is worth studying. However, given the often superficial assessment of social support and the inattention to process issues, many of these studies contribute but marginally to our understanding of support phenomena.

Keywords

Mental Health Social Support Social Network Social Identity Marital Satisfaction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Berndt, T. (1982). The features and effects of friendship in early adolescence. Child Development. 53. 1447–1460.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Bloom, B . (1979). Prevention of mental disorders: Recent advances in theory and practice. Community Mental Health Journal. 15. 179–191.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Chapman, L., Chapman, J., & Miller, E. (1982). Reliabilities and intercorrelations of eight measures of pronenese to psychosis. Journal of Consulting. and CIinical Psychology, 50. 187–195.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Conger, J. (1977). Adolescence and youth: Psychological development in a changing world (2nd edition). New York: Harper & Row.Google Scholar
  5. DeFour, D. (in progress). The adaptation of Black graduate students: A social network approach. Doctoral dissertation, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.Google Scholar
  6. Depue, R., Slater, J., Wolfstetter-Kausch, Klein, D., Coplerud, E., & Farr, D. (1981). A behavioral paradigm for identifying persons at risk for bipolar depressive disorder: A conceptual framework and five validation studies. Journal of Abnormal Psychology. 90. 381–437.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Depue, R., Slater, J., Wolfstetter-Kausch, Klein, D., Goplerud, E., & Farr, D. (1981). A behavioral paradigm for identifying persons at risk for bipolar depressive disorder: A conceptual framework and five validation studies. Journal of Abnormal Psychology. 90 381–437.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Derogatis, L., & Spencer, P. (1982). The Brief Symptom Inventory Manual. Division of Medical Psychology, John Hopkins University School of Medicine.Google Scholar
  9. Douvan, E., & Adelson, J. (1950). The adolescent experience. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  10. Erikson, E. (1950). Childhood and society. New York: Norton.Google Scholar
  11. Fischer, C., Jackson, R., Stueve, C., Gerson, K., Jones, L., with Baldassare, M. (1977). Networks and places: Social relations in the urban setting. New York: Free Press.Google Scholar
  12. Gilligan, C . (1982). In a different voice: Psycho logical theory and women’s development. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  13. Hackman, J., & Oldham, G. (1980). Work redesign. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley.Google Scholar
  14. Henry, J . (1958). The personal comcunity and its invariant properties. American Anthropologist. 60. 827–831.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Hirsch, B. (1980). Natural support systems and coping with major life changes. American journal of Community Psychology, 8. 159–172.Google Scholar
  16. Hirsch, B . (1981a). Coping and adaptation in high-risk populations: A social network approach. Schizophrenia Bulletin, 164–172.Google Scholar
  17. Hirsch, B. (1981b). Social networks and the coping process: Creating personal communities. In B. Gottlieb (Ed.), Social networks and social support. Beverly Hills: Sage.Google Scholar
  18. Hirsch, B. (1981b). Social networks and the coping process: Creating personal communities. In B. Gottlieb (Ed.), Social networks and social support. Beverly Hills: Sage.Google Scholar
  19. Hirsch, B., & David, T. (1983). Social networks and work/nonwork life: Action-research with nurse managers. American Journal of Community Psychology. 11. 493–508.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Hirsch, B., & Jolly, E. A. (1983). Role transitions and social networks: Social support for multiple roles. In V. L. Allen & E. van de Vliert (Eds.), Role transitions. New York: Plenum.Google Scholar
  21. Hirsch, B., & Reischl, T. (in preparation). Social networks, adolescent development, and mental health: A study of high-risk and normal adolescents.Google Scholar
  22. House, J. (1981). Work stress and social support. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley.Google Scholar
  23. Kanter, R. M. (1977). Work family in the United States: A critical review and agenda for research and policy. New York: Russell Sage.Google Scholar
  24. Kasl, S. (1978). Epidemiological contributions to the study of work stress. In C. Cooper & R. Payne (Eds.), Stress at work. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  25. McCall, G., & Sirsmons, J. (1978). Identities and interaction (rev. ed.). New York: Free Press.Google Scholar
  26. Mead, G. (1934). Mind, self and society. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  27. Miller, D. (1963). The study of social relationships: Situation, identity, and social interaction. In S. Koch (Ed.), Psychology: A study of a science. (Vol. 5 ). New York: McGraw & Hill.Google Scholar
  28. National Joint Practice Commission . (1981). Guidelines for establishing joint or collaboratice practice in hospitals. Chicago.Google Scholar
  29. Newcomb, M., Huba, G., & Bentler, P. (1981). A multidimensional assessment of stressful life events among adolescents: Derivation and correlates. Journal of Health and Social Behavior. 22. 400–414.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Rappaport, J. (1977). Community Psychology: Values, research and action. New York: Holt, Rinehart, & Winston.Google Scholar
  31. Reischl, T. (in progress). Coping with academic probation: The interactive effects of social skills. social networks. and formal helping programs. Master’s thesis, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.Google Scholar
  32. Sarbin, T. (1968). Notes on the transformation of social identity. In L. Roberts, N. Greenfield, & N. Miller (Eds.), Comprehensive mental health: The challenge of evalutation. Madison: University of Wiscons in Press.Google Scholar
  33. Sullivan, H. (1953). The interpersonal theory of psychiatry. New York: Norton.Google Scholar
  34. Thoits, P . (1982). Conceptual, methodological, and theoretical problems in studying social support as a buffer against life stress. Journal of Health and Social Behavior. 23. 174–158.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Thoits, P. (1983). Multiple identities and psychological well-being: A reformulation and test of the social isolation hypothesis. American Sociological Review. 48. 174–187.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Tolsdorf, C . (1976). Social networks, support, and coping: An exploratory study. Family Process. 15. 407–417.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Wilcox, B. (1981). Social support is adjusting to marital disruption: A network analysis. In B. Gottlieb (Ed.), Social networks and social support. Beverly Hills: Sage.Google Scholar
  38. Wylie, R. The self-concept: A critical survey of pertinent research literature. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1974.Google Scholar
  39. Zarling, C. (in progress). The caregiving environment of the premature infant: Maternal social networks and infant development. Doctoral dissertation, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, Dordrecht 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barton J. Hirsch
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignUSA

Personalised recommendations