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Changes in Cardiac Contractility in Burn Shock

  • Zhoudao Chen
  • Wijun Fu
  • Yuming Yang
  • Jianguo Chen
  • Zhendong Lu
  • Keda Yu

Abstract

Based on the evidence obtained from experiments on myocardial mechanics, some investigators1 have proposed taking the following indices as measures for the contractility of the intact heart, since these may be relatively less influenced by the factors before and after load on the heart: (1) the maximum rate of change in the left intraventricular pressure (expressed as dp/dt max.), (2) the ratio of dp/dt to the value of the instantaneous left intraventricular pressure (as (dp/dt)/p) and (3) the left intraventricular pressure-rate of pressure change loop (p-(dp/dt) loop, or simply ‘cardiac force loop’). These indices have been used widely in the investigation of hemonhagic, toxic as well as traumatic, shock2 and also in acute hypoxic tolerance of the heart3 to measure the condition of cardiac involvement. But in burn shock, most of the investigators evaluated the functional condition of the heart by determining the cardiac output and calculating the heart work4–6, and few of them approached this problem through direct measurement of the cardiac contractility on the basis of myocardial mechanics. In the work reported in this chapter, the cardiac contractility of dogs during the course of their Burn shock was estimated by measuring and calculating their first derivatives of the left intraventricular pressure, the velocity of shortening of the contractile elements of the myocardium (VCE) and the left intraventricular pressure — the rate of pressure change loop (p — (dp/dt) loop).

Keywords

Myocardial Contractility Cardiac Involvement Ventricular Pressure Cardiac Contractility Contractile Element 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© MTP Press Limited 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zhoudao Chen
    • 1
  • Wijun Fu
    • 1
  • Yuming Yang
    • 1
  • Jianguo Chen
    • 1
  • Zhendong Lu
    • 1
  • Keda Yu
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PhysiologyChina
  2. 2.Department of BioelectronicsSecond Military Medical CollegeShanghaiChina

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