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Physicians and Cost Control

  • Charles E. Begley
Part of the Philosophy and Medicine book series (PHME, volume 21)

Abstract

It can be argued that there are only two policy alternatives for the United States regarding the integration of cost control into the health care system: first, rationing by government, private payers, and health care plans through administrative rules, or second, rationing by providers and patients in response to economic incentives. In the first approach the rules of resource allocation are defined outside the provider-patient relationship on the basis of institution- or society- determined resource constraints. Certain service options are not made available, and providers and patients are made to choose what other services will be provided on the basis of the allocated resources. This approach is exemplified by the regulatory policies of the 1970s, which attempted to contain costs by imposing limits on the availability of resources and establishing guidelines for resource use.1

Keywords

Traditional View Ethical Problem Cost Control Basic Minimum Ethical Conflict 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© D. Reidel Publishing Company 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charles E. Begley
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Public HealthUniversity of Texas Health Science CenterHoustonUSA

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