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Organic residues in modern agriculture

  • Y. Avnimelech
Part of the Developments in Plant and Soil Sciences book series (DPSS, volume 25)

Abstract

Manures and composts have been used as a means to increase soil fertility and crop production all along the history of farming. Organic residues were the only means of adding nitrogen and the most important means to add other nutrients until development of chemical fertilizers production and distribution systems. Presently, the chemical industry provides concentrated inorganic fertilizers that are easily handled and distributed, and that can supply the need for any nutrient element. This development offsets the use of organic residues as a sole source for nutrients and in some cases eliminates the use of manures and compost to a point where these materials are accumulating and not being used. In many places organic residues are becoming more of a problem rather than an asset. Whereas the old Jewish laws dealt with the ownership of manure found on public properties, modern laws deal with the responsibility for the disposal of manure.

Keywords

Organic Matter Soil Organic Matter Organic Amendment Inorganic Fertilizer Organic Residue 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, Dordrecht 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Y. Avnimelech

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