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Computer Design

  • A. de Pennington
  • G. C. Carey

Abstract

It is not the intention of this chapter to provide a comprehensive survey of all the technical aspects relating to computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacture. The reader will be given an overall appreciation of the capabilities of the currently emerging computer-aided engineering techniques with particular reference to solid modelling.

Keywords

Solid Modelling Computer Design Engineering Drawing Constructive Solid Geometry Material Requirement Planning 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Elsevier Applied Science Publishers LTD 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. de Pennington
    • 1
  • G. C. Carey
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringUniversity of LeedsUK

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