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The Rapidity of CO2-Induced Climatic Change: Observations, Model Results and Palaeoclimatic Implications

Chapter
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (ASIC, volume 216)

Abstract

The rates of global and regional temperature changes due to increasing greenhouse gas concentrations are estimated using a multibox, upwelling-diffusion climate model. The model is also used to estimate how these changes might be perturbed by changes in deep water formation rate. The results are interpreted in a palaeoclimatic context and it is shown that the magnitude and rapidity of observed late-glacial changes in climate are compatible with large shifts in the rate of formation of North Atlantic Deep Water.

Keywords

Climate Sensitivity North Atlantic Deep Water Deep Water Formation Abrupt Climatic Change Increase Carbon Dioxide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© D. Reidel Publishing Company, Dordrecht, Holland 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Climatic Research Unit School of Environmental SciencesUniversity of East AngliaNorwichUK

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