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Concepts of Disease and Sexuality

  • Joseph Margolis
Part of the Philosophy and Medicine book series (PHME, volume 22)

Abstract

One can’t help noticing how much the power of Socrates’ discussion of virtue in the state and the human soul depends on confusing — perhaps ironically — the tautologically assigned functions of various social professions and roles and the seemingly equally easy identification of the natural function of human beings. In the Republic, for instance, quite slyly, Socrates asks Thrasymachos: “Do you think there is a virtue in each thing which has a work appointed to it?” He then mentions the eyes and the ears and somehow springs at once to the work of the soul — “to care, to rule, to plan, and all things like that”; in fact, the virtue of the soul is announced as ‘justice’, though in closing this first portion of the dialogue Socrates confesses to not even knowing what justice is (Republic, Bk. 1).

Keywords

Sexual Health Sexual Dysfunction Sexual Functioning Behavioral Medicine Natural Kind 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© D. Reidel Publishing Company 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph Margolis
    • 1
  1. 1.Temple UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA

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