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A C° Elastoplastic Shell Element Based on Assumed Covariant Strain Interpolations

  • Peter M. Pinsky
  • Junho Jang
Conference paper

Summary

A curved 9-node C° shell finite element for elastoplastic analysis is proposed which is free from serious locking problems, does not possess hourglass modes and provides solutions which are quite insensitive to mesh distortion. The element is based on the use of modified strain fields which are obtained from assumed interpolations of covariant (non-physical) strains referred to the element natural coordinate system. The linear elastic shell formulation is described first and this is then extended for an elastoplastic constitutive model. A return mapping algorithm is introduced for integration of the rate constitutive equations under the zero normal stress hypothesis. Some numerical results, illustrating the good convergence characteristics of the element, are reported.

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References

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, Dordrecht 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter M. Pinsky
    • 1
  • Junho Jang
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Civil EngineeringStanford UniversityStanfordUSA

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