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Coffee pp 147-199 | Cite as

Drying

  • R. J. Clarke
Chapter

Abstract

The drying of coffee extracts to a low moisture content (2–5%) is now generally only commercially accomplished in one of two ways: spray-drying by evaporative removal of water in a current of hot air; and freeze-drying, in which the water in the extract is first frozen and the ice sublimed off under high vacuum with controlled application of heat. Some desorptive drying still at relatively low temperature will take place, however, in the later stages of freeze-drying. Drum-drying (contact with a heated cylindrical surface), as once also used for the drying of milk, is hardly ever now used. There may also be some applications for vacuum-drying (band- and shelf-), and fluidised-bed drying is often recommended for finish drying in certain instances.

Keywords

Volatile Compound Droplet Size Soluble Solid Fourier Number Feed Temperature 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Elsevier Science Publishers LTD 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. J. Clarke
    • 1
  1. 1.Formerly of General Foods LtdBanbury, OxonUK

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