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Practical Aspects of Testing Circumferential Notch Specimens at High Temperature

  • Malcolm S. Loveday
Chapter

Abstract

Notch testing evolved as a means of assessing the performance of materials subjected to a stress concentration equivalent to those typically encountered in engineering components.Turbine bolting failures in Germany in the 1930s promoted the idea of the use of notch testing (Kuntze, 1932). The present British Standard notch, BS3500, has a notch angle of 60°, being the same as that of ISO thread profiles, BS3643. The British Standard notch evolved from the desire to test specimens having a notch with an elastic stress concentration factor, Kt = 3′9, which was similar to that encountered in typical engineering components. Values of elastic stress concentration factors for a variety of notches and grooves have been tabulated in graphical form by Peterson (1953), based on the original work of Neuber (1937). Semi-circular circumferential notch geometries were proposed by Bridgman (1952) for generating a triaxial stress state and have been further analysed under steady state creep conditions by Hayhurst and Henderson (1977) and under creep damage rupture conditions by Hayhurst, Leckie and Morrison (1978). The methods of stress analysis of such notches are reviewed in Chapter 9.

Keywords

Computer Numerical Control Notch Root Notch Width High Temperature Mechanical Property Notch Root Radius 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Elsevier Applied Science Publishers Ltd 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Malcolm S. Loveday
    • 1
  1. 1.National Physical LaboratoryTeddington, MiddlesexUK

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