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GFAP Immunoreactivity of Oligoastrocytomas Study of 120 Cases

  • J. R. Iglesias
  • E. Kazner
  • C. Aruffo
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Part of the Developments in Oncology book series (DION, volume 52)

Abstract

Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is a distinct cytoskeletal protein (1) which represents the principal constituent of glial filaments (3). Because of its easy immunocytochemical detection it has been used as a specific glial marker in studies of glial cytology in CNS neoplasms (2–4). Very few reports exist in which the immune reactivity of oligoastrocytomas is described (6,8). We wish to present our results in a large series of primary oligoastrocytomas.

Key words

Oligoastrocytomas Mixed gliomas GFAP Histopathology Immunocytochemistry 

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, Dordrecht 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. R. Iglesias
  • E. Kazner
    • 1
  • C. Aruffo
    • 2
  1. 1.Neurosurgical ClinicRudolf Virchow KrankenhausBerlin 65Germany
  2. 2.Institute of NeuropathologyKlinikum Steglitz der Freien Universität BerlinBerlin 45Germany

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