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Amplification and Expression of Viral Sequences and Oncogenes in Human Brain Tumors

  • A. L. Benabid
  • C. Chauvin
  • A. M. Foote
  • M. Suh
  • M. Danik
  • M. Laine
  • M. Chaffanet
  • C. Mercier
  • N. Rost
Chapter
  • 37 Downloads
Part of the Developments in Oncology book series (DION, volume 52)

Abstract

Although the cause of cancers is still unknown, experimental data of the last ten years have led to the theory that the abnormal growth pattern typical of cancer is related to changes in the genome of cells (11, 16, 18). The changes can be due to mutations in the gene sequence either spontaneously occurring or due to oncogenic agents (X-rays, chemicals or viruses) (9–14). The altered genes have been demonstrated to be responsible for the induction of malignant transformation in cell cultures or in animals. Oncogenic sequences have been found in the genomic material of cell lines derived from tumors or in solid tumors (11, 16). The purpose of this study was to investigate by hybridization methods the presence of such transforming genes in the genome of brain tumors, either as introduced by viruses (Herpes simplex virus, Simian Virus 40, Adenovirus type 2) or as analog to oncogenes of retroviruses.

Key-words

Brain tumors Oncogenes Herpes Simplex Virus Simian Virus 40 Adenovirus type 2 

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, Dordrecht 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. L. Benabid
  • C. Chauvin
  • A. M. Foote
    • 1
  • M. Suh
  • M. Danik
    • 2
  • M. Laine
  • M. Chaffanet
    • 1
  • C. Mercier
    • 2
  • N. Rost
    • 1
  1. 1.LMCEC, Department of BiophysicsGrenoble University Medical SchoolLa TroncheFrance
  2. 2.Institut du Cancer et Departement de NeurochirurgieHôpital Notre-DameMontréalCanada

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