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Soil and litter invertebrates

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Part of the Tasks for vegetation science book series (TAVS, volume 19)

Abstract

Soil and litter invertebrates are a large, but generally inconspicuous, component of the biota of mediterranean regions whose existence is of crucial importance to the functioning of these ecosystems. Some groups are involved in the regulation of nutrient cycles, the maintenance of soil structure or are linked through their herbivorous activities with the productivity and dynamics of plant communities. Other taxa play an important role in seed dispersal and survival, in pollination or they may provide an important food source for insectivores. It is therefore fitting that this volume includes a chapter which compares the soil and litter invertebrates of the various mediterranean regions.

Keywords

Biology Bulletin Pitfall Trap Dung Beetle Temperate Rainforest Historia Natural 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Botany DepartmentUniversity of QueenslandSt LuciaAustralia

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