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Distant Galaxies: Limits on Cosmology and Evolution

  • Richard S. Ellis
Part of the Astrophysics and Space Science Library book series (ASSL, volume 141)

Abstract

Detailed studies of intermediate redshift (0.1 < z < 0.6) galaxies are changing our ideas of galaxy evolution. In rich clusters, extended star formation histories are found in some but not all early-type objects. Together with variable blue fractions, the activity observed suggests local processes dictate the appearance of an individual galaxy at high redshift and thus the concept of a generalised evolutionary correction can no longer be meaningful. In field samples, spectroscopic surveys indicate that if luminosity evolution is responsible for the steep galaxy number count relation, it must be of a luminosity-dependent form. Brief spectacular enhancements in star formation activity in otherwise low luminosity galaxies may explain the excess faint galaxies at B ~ 22. The similarity between the cluster and field activities is striking. The absence of high luminosity primeval galaxies may now be understood via the extended star formation observed in both samples, but a physical mechanism for the bursts of star formation seen remains to be found.

Keywords

Star Formation High Redshift Star Formation Rate Early Type Galaxy Galaxy Evolution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard S. Ellis
    • 1
  1. 1.Physics DepartmentUniversity of DurhamEngland

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