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The Development of Population Research on Causes of Death: Growth of Knowledge or Accumulation of Data?

  • B. Ingemar B. Lindahl
Chapter
Part of the Philosophy and Medicine book series (PHME, volume 36)

Abstract

The great importance of cause-of-death data for historic, medical and social science research is undisputed. For a long time in the early history of public health planning in Europe, as well as in other parts of the world, information on causes of death were the only nationwide data available on the health of the population.1 Although other measures were also used, such as infant mortality rate and mean life expectancy, the cause-of-death statistics were the only data on specific conditions. Even so, the occurrence of fatal conditions is a very limited measure of the state of health in a population. Nowadays we have access to morbidity data both through registers and statistics. Yet the cause-of-death data have not outlived their usefulness. They are still an important source of information in themselves and a valuable complement to morbidity data in population research and public health planning.

Keywords

Death Certificate Data Collection Process Population Research Objective Knowledge International Statistical Classification 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Ingemar B. Lindahl
    • 1
  1. 1.Karolinska Institute, Department of Social MedicineHuddinge University HospitalSweden

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