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Overview of Contamination from U.S. and Russian Nuclear Complexes

  • D. J. Bradley
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (ASDT, volume 8)

Abstract

Over the last 50 years, Russia and the United States have developed the largest nuclear weapons complexes in the world. In doing so, they have also created the world’s largest inventories of radioactive materials. Although parts of these inventories have decayed to insignificant levels (or have been stored in engineered systems such as tanks, or placed into a waste form such as glass), significant amounts have been released to the environment. In both countries, the primary contaminated areas are located at or near facilities that reprocessed fuel from weapons materials production reactors. In the United States, these locations are the Hanford, Savannah River, and Oak Ridge sites. In Russia, the corresponding sites are Mayak (near the city of Ozersk, formerly Chelyabinsk-65), Tomsk-7 (now called Seversk), and Krasnoyarsk-26 (now called Zheleznogorsk), all of which are located in western Siberia.

Keywords

Radioactive Waste Spend Nuclear Fuel Former Soviet Union Liquid Radioactive Waste Nuclear Fuel Cycle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. J. Bradley
    • 1
  1. 1.Pacific Northwest LaboratoryRichlandUSA

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