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Introduction

  • Uwe Reyle
  • Christian Rohrer
Chapter
Part of the Studies in Linguistics and Philosophy book series (SLAP, volume 35)

Abstract

This volume consists of a collection of the papers presented at the interdisciplinary workshop ’Word-order and Parsing in Unification Grammars’ that took place in Friedenweiler (Schwarzwald) in April 1986. Two additional papers (Reyle, Wehrli) have been included that were not presented at the workshop. All the papers have been refereed and revised for publication. The workshop was organized by the members of the research project ’EUROTRA-D Begleitforschung (EUROTRA Germany accompanying research) which is sponsored by the BMFT (Secretary of Research and Technology). The aim of this research project is to investigate to what extent recent linguistic theories (especially Unification Grammars (UG) such as Lexical Functional Grammar (LFG) and Generalized Phrase Structure Grammar (GPSG)) can serve as a basis for machine translation. The results of this investigation, which is more oriented towards research than towards application, will be made available to EUROTRA, the Machine Translation Project of the EEC. At the workshop the problem was phrased in more general terms:

What can recent linguistic theories contribute to natural language processing?

Shieber’s paper is an attempt to answer this question.

Keywords

Noun Phrase Machine Translation Relative Clause Linguistic Theory Categorial Grammar 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© D. Reidel Publishing Company 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Uwe Reyle
    • 1
  • Christian Rohrer
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für Maschinelle SprachverarbeitungUniversität StuttgartGermany

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